Events

For detailed information on the programmes organised by the Society select by clicking on one of the items on the left.

Non members are welcome to attend our in-person talks in Derby and a limited number of places for the online talks are available for non members to book using Eventbrite.

The Calendar can be displayed in either Month or List format.

For specific information on a particular event shown on the calendar opposite please hover or click on the selected event. 

Colour Key:

DAS Outing

Non DAS Event

DAS Other Event

DAS Talk (online)

DAS talk (in person)

Library Open

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  • The Work of the Landmark Trust
    19:30 -21:00
    08/10/2021

    Speaker: Caroline Stanford

    A talk about the work of the national building preservation charity rescuing historic buildings at risk and converting them for holiday use for all to ensure their future. The talk will look especially at the fascinating and largely forgotten stories of some of Landmark’s iconic buildings in and near Derbyshire: North Street Cromford, Tixall Gatehouse, Swarkestone Pavilion, Alton Station and Knowle Hill.

    Caroline Stanford FSA, BA, MA, MSc (Hist Con) is Landmark’s in-house research historian. She heads up the research on all their 200+ buildings and works as a member of the project team of all their projects to help inform their restoration.

    Organised by the Architectural Section

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  • Books do furnish a room?
    19:30 -21:00
    22/10/2021
    Darley Lane, Derby, DE1 3AX

    Speaker: Stuart Ian Mitchell

    Sir William Boothby, who lived at Ashbourne Hall in Derbyshire in the 1670s and 1680s, was passionate about books.  ‘My books’ he wrote, ‘are the great joy of my life’.  He was not alone in this. But how many books were actually read? And how many were for show? This talk explores some of the ways in which books were perceived as objects of material culture as well as literary texts in the long eighteenth century.  A book owned was not necessarily a book read.  It looks at the way in which access to books might be a marker of respectability and politeness, both through ownership and through book clubs; at book collecting as a type of conspicuous consumption; and at the eccentric, almost obsessive, fringe of book buying – that ‘passion for collecting books; not so much to be instructed by them, as to gratify the eye by looking at them’.  Books were one of the objects that revealed, or perhaps created, important aspects of the taste and socio-cultural status of their owner.

    Organised by the Local History Section

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